Monday, June 09, 2003

Sisters...

First at few comments on your extensive blogging.....

Sister Iris, you asked what became of Irani young men. Well, some of them find jobs in shops and small business, train to do skilled work like mechanics and the like. But one of the things that was pointed out to us, was that there is a very large proportion of unemployed young men in the country, who also have a lot of frustrations. The reason why there are more women in higher education, is that they do better at school and therefore have better chances at getting through entrance exams. This is not surprising, in most countries girls do better at school simply because they apply themselves more. Maybe they should simply make quotas.....

I agree with you that the world needs men with advanced qualifications just as it needs women and especially (from my own selfish point of view) that we women need challenging male companions, at work as at home !

Reading Sister Iris's piece on gardening, I felt slightly, well, touchy. I think I am one of those people that should be exiled to permanent apartment-in-big-city-dom with occasional licence to roam the countryside. I don't want to be stuck in an apartment for the rest of my life, preferably, I want a house later on, if I can afford it. With a garden. But this garden will include a) grass b) fruit trees and bushes. I am notoriously bad at gardening and find it somewhat of a bother. I can't tell the difference between a weed and a newly sprung flower. I hate the way my back aches after gardening. But I love the green and I love having fresh produce from my own garden. Hence, I have figured it thus : if I have a lawn, i'll have a fresh green space and fruit trees and bushes will flower and give fruit. And my husband can cut the lawn and trim the trees/bushes. Good plan ?

Oh, and I don't insist on astro-turf like lawns...if the dandelions want to grow there, they can go right ahead.....

But, my dear Sisters, I actually wanted to blogg on a bit from a book today. It is called S/HE - Changing Sex and Changing Clothes (Claudine Griggs, Berg 1998). This is an anthropological study of transsexuals ( Male to female and Female to Male) and i took it down the shelf, bc I thought it might be useful for my paper on clothing and the body. It turned out to be much more interesting than I thought. Apart from the fact that it is highly autobiographical, which can get annoying at times, it really gave a good insight into something which I think most of us have a hard time understanding and brought up a whole lot of very interesting issues.

I stumbled over a bit which I thought in some ways fit into our men and academia debate...so here goes...:

'Elements of the sought after gender role can cause private discomfort once it is obtained, i.e., most male to female transsexuals do not appreciate moving into a world of 'second-class citizenship' or being victims of sex discrimination. And while I understood some of the inequities when I lived as a man, it was quite a different matter to experience them firsthand. Some new matters included lower wages and a presumption of stupidity. I tolerated unwanted sexual advances and couldn't understand why 'no' didn't convey 'no' after I changed attributed gender'.

I can't say, I didn't feel slightly triumphant reading this passage. Claudine pointed out, that most female to male transexuals found, that people listened more to what they had to say as men. Do men find academia unattractive because in these spheres women may question their 'natural' authority ?
I wonder......

Well sisters...just one final reminder....I need you adresses, as I have now completed the production of our newest Nunnery CDs, please send them to me....Sister Scarlett


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